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Stoneacre

Thought to take its name from the local ragstone on which it stands, Stoneacre was built in the 1480s by John Ellys and most of his original hall-house remains to this day. However, there were problems with the north wing in the mid-16th century due to the steep slope and poor foundation.

The cellars and ground floor had to be rebuilt in stone with buttresses to stop the slippage, as is visible today. Around this time, hall-houses were generally going out of fashion so the opportunity was taken to insert an upper floor into the original hall. The Ellys family continued to hold Stoneacre until 1725 when it was sold and occupied by tenants.

In 1920 the house, by now a ruin, was purchased by Aymer Vallance who set about reconstructing it to his vision of a Tudor yeoman's dwelling. He re-opened the hall to its full height, losing two bedrooms in the process. These were instead provided by an extension to the south with a library underneath. The old single-storey scullery to the rear was removed and a 16th century farmhouse, which was due to be demolished (North Bore Place in Chiddingstone) was used to build a new two-storey wing at the north end. The new wing provided a servants' hall and kitchen below with two maid's bedrooms above.

The main entrance door is original, although it was restored by Vallance. Through the door is the screens passage, of whicih the framework is original but the panels are by Vallance since the originals had rotted. The great hall is dominated by the roof, which is supported by a huge tie-beam carrying a crown post consisting of four engaged columns. When the hall was divided, the original central hearth was replaced by a brick and rubble chimney. During Vallance's restoration work this was in turn replaced by a 15th century fireplace from The George public house in Sittingbourne. The chimney above is 20th century.

In 1928, the property was presented to the National Trust.

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